The TraRon Center

Helping those affected by gun violence heal through the arts.

“With a focus on creative arts, we will equip those affected by gun violence with healthy ways to deal with their trauma.”

  • I am Tracy Hall, the "Tra" in TraRon. I was killed on December 3, 1993 by a person with a gun.
  • I am Ronald but my family and friends called me Ronnie. I am the "Ron" in TraRon.
  • Board Member Lois Fingerhut
  • Our partners Jazmine and Michael stopped by to drop-off books.
  • One of our Art Afternoon's students viewing the work of photographer Michael McCoy. (Photo Credit: Michael McCoy)
  • Images from Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.
  • Photography week at Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.  (Photo Credit: Michael McCoy)
  • Images from Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.
  • Smile for the camera. (Photo Credit: Michael McCoy)
  • Images from Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.
  • Our founder and president Ryane B. Nickens visits the spot where her brother Ronnie was killed in 1996 for the first time. (Photo Credit: Andre Chung)
  • Our founder and president Ryane B. Nickens in a peer support session. (Photo Credit: Andre Chung)
  • Our founder and president talking over programming with one of our partners. (Photo Credit: Andre Chung)
  • I am Tracy Hall, the "Tra" in TraRon. I was killed on December 3, 1993 by a person with a gun.
  • I am Ronald but my family and friends called me Ronnie. I am the "Ron" in TraRon.
  • Board Member Lois Fingerhut
  • Our partners Jazmine and Michael stopped by to drop-off books.
  • One of our Art Afternoon's students viewing the work of photographer Michael McCoy. (Photo Credit: Michael McCoy)
  • Images from Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.
  • Photography week at Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane. (Photo Credit: Michael McCoy)
  • Images from Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.
  • Smile for the camera. (Photo Credit: Michael McCoy)
  • Images from Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.
  • Our founder and president Ryane B. Nickens visits the spot where her brother Ronnie was killed in 1996 for the first time. (Photo Credit: Andre Chung)
  • Our founder and president Ryane B. Nickens in a peer support session. (Photo Credit: Andre Chung)
  • Our founder and president talking over programming with one of our partners. (Photo Credit: Andre Chung)
  • I am Tracy Hall, the "Tra" in TraRon. I was killed on December 3, 1993 by a person with a gun.
  • I am Ronald but my family and friends called me Ronnie. I am the "Ron" in TraRon.
  • Board Member Lois Fingerhut
  • Our partners Jazmine and Michael stopped by to drop-off books.
  • One of our Art Afternoon's students viewing the work of photographer Michael McCoy. (Photo Credit: Michael McCoy)
  • Images from Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.
  • Photography week at Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.  (Photo Credit: Michael McCoy)
  • Images from Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.
  • Smile for the camera. (Photo Credit: Michael McCoy)
  • Images from Artful Afternoon's in Langston Lane.
  • Our founder and president Ryane B. Nickens visits the spot where her brother Ronnie was killed in 1996 for the first time. (Photo Credit: Andre Chung)
  • Our founder and president Ryane B. Nickens in a peer support session. (Photo Credit: Andre Chung)
  • Our founder and president talking over programming with one of our partners. (Photo Credit: Andre Chung)

The TraRon Center in the News

  • Exactly one month ago, a father and husband from Takoma Park was shot and killed in the District, hit by a stray bullet shortly after he and his wife left a restaurant on 14th Street Northwest near Logan Circle. D.C. Police are still searching for the person or persons responsible for the death of 53-year-old Jeremy Black.

    Meanwhile, his grieving family has partnered with a D.C. nonprofit that works to help communities that are hardest hit by gun violence.

  • In one of the most troubled neighborhoods in the nation’s capital, a new center is trying to stop the bloodshed.

  • “My life is an example of how you can turn pain into purpose,” says Ryane Nickens, the founder of Washington, D.C.’s TraRon Center.

    Ryane Nickens was 12 when she lost her first relative to gun violence. The victim in that 1989 shooting was her 20-year-old uncle, David Williams. Then, in 1993, a shooting in Nickens’ Southeast Washington, D.C., neighborhood killed her pregnant sister Tracy, 18, and injured her mother, Linda Bunn, as well as Ryane’s sister Dee Dee and her brother Ronnie.

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